COACH
JOHN
WOODEN'S

RULES

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YOUR EDUCATION
  • You are going to college for an education.  I want every athlete to earn and receive a degree.  Keep that first in your thoughts:  place basketball second

  • Do not cut classes to be on time for practice. 

  • Get your work completed and turned in on time.  Do not fall behind. 

  • Keep regular study hours. 

  • Arrange with your professors in advance when you must be absent. 

  • Do not expect favors.  Do your part. 

  • Athletes on grant-in-aid should arrange for tutoring through the Athletic Department at the first indication of need.   

  • Work for a high-grade point average.  Do not be satisfied by merely meeting the eligibility requirements. 

  • Athletes with campus jobs for grant-in-aid must have enough required credit hours. Do your assignment without comparing it with another student. 

  • Earn the respect of everyone, especially yourself.   

PRACTICE
  • Be dressed, on the floor, and ready for practice on time every day.  There is no substitute for industriousness and enthusiasm.  

  • Warm-up, work on your weaknesses then shoot some free throws when you take the floor.  Do this until organized practice begins. 

  • Work hard to improve yourself without having to be forced.  Be serious.  Have fun without clowning around.  You develop only by doing your best. 

  • No cliques, no complaining, no criticizing, no jealousy, no egotism, no envy, no alibis. Earn the respect of all. 

  • Never leave the floor without permission.

  • When a coach blows the whistle, give him your undivided attention and respond immediately.   

  • Move quickly to get in position to start a new drill 

  • Keep a neat practice appearance with shirt tucked in, socks pulled up. 

  • Take excellent care of your equipment and keep your locker neat and orderly. Record your weight in and out every day. 

  • Do things the way you have been told and do not have to be reminded every day. Correct habits are formed only through continued repetition of the perfect model. 

  • Be clever, not fancy.  Good, clever play brings praise while fancy play brings ridicule and criticism. 

  • When group activity is stopped to correct one individual, everyone pay close attention so the mistake will not be repeated.  

  • Condition comes from hard work during practice and proper mental and moral conduct.

  • Poise, confidence and self-control come from being prepared. 

NORMAL EXPECTATIONS

Chances of having a successful team may be in direct proportion to the ability of each athlete to live up to the following suggestions: ​

  • Be a gentleman at all times. 

  • Be a team player always. 

  • Be on time whenever time is involved. 

  • Be a good student in all subjects, not just in basketball. 

  • Be enthusiastic, industrious, dependable, loyal, and cooperative. 

  • Be in the best possible condition:  physically, mentally, and morally. 

  • Earn the right to be proud and confident. 

  • Keep emotions under control without losing fight or aggressiveness. 

  • Work constantly to improve without becoming satisfied. 

  • Acquire peace of mind by becoming the best that you are capable of becoming. 

  • Never criticize, nag, or razz a teammate. 

  • Never miss or be last for any class or appointment.

  • Never be selfish, jealous, envious, or egotistical. 

  • Never expect favors. 

  • Never waste time. 

  • Never make excuses. 

  • Never require repeated criticism for the same mistake.

  • Never lose faith or patience. 

  • Never grandstand, loaf, sulk or boast. 

  • Never have reason to be sorry afterwards. 

The player who gives his best is sure of success;  the player who gives less than his best is a failure.